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Why dont funds target Yale, Gtech?

Many quant funds that recruit/advertise on campus or list school on their website include mit, stanford, princeton, harvard, uiuc but omit yale, georgia tech, caltech.. why?
The yale department is tiny but so is harvards.
Gtech is top 3 in cs/ee so why not there?

Do grads just network with alums?
 
I don't believe the answer to this is simple or singular. Every firm has its own list of places/ways to recruit, much of it depends on budget, location, tradition, etc.
There is a reason a tiny dept does not attract many firms because it's more economical for company to get access to as many applicants as possible in one trip.

A lot of jobs are going directly from alum to a program's career person instead of via the public. For example, CMU MSCF has built a large presence at DB because over years through its alumni recruiting.
 
Strange...Yale has one of the most spectacularly successful endowments...anybody who has any experience there = probably one of the best candidates in finance an employer could ever find.
 
Strange...Yale has one of the most spectacularly successful endowments...anybody who has any experience there = probably one of the best candidates in finance an employer could ever find.

Not sure what a successful endowment has to do with being a successful finance candidate...

Some of the best candidates I've found in any field have come from small private programs and even, yes, second tier ones. Big fish in a little pond, I'd reckon.

If you come from a non-target you tend to play second fiddle but if they don't come to you, you need to find them.
 

Joy Pathak

Swaptionz
Not sure what a successful endowment has to do with being a successful finance candidate...

Some of the best candidates I've found in any field have come from small private programs and even, yes, second tier ones. Big fish in a little pond, I'd reckon.

If you come from a non-target you tend to play second fiddle but if they don't come to you, you need to find them.

Yale has one of the most spectacularly successful endowments...anybody who has any experience there

I think he mean't anybody who has worked for the endowments. Many students in business schools intern or work part-time as analysts for endowments. It is very common at the institutions where the endowment is managed in-house.

But anyways....The part about funds/banks not targetting Yale is not true. There are a few in my summer analyst class from Yale especially in Sales & Trading. Many of the funds in Stamford, Greenwich and Westport have Yale students/alumni. I have spoken to a few people at the funds in the area from Yale at events in downtown stamford. They were mostly math and econ majors. New Haven is so close...I think most of the banks/funds recruit at Yale.
 
Yes the BBs recruit at Yale as well as the other targets, but undergrad Yalies tend to prefer IB than S&T. BB S&T is a seperate world from the algo trading, stat arb prop shops and hedge funds.

The original post was stating quant hedge funds/props shops like two sigma, spark, tower, etc dont visit the campus of some of the best quant type schools such as gtech, caltech and not really quanty yale but do visit princeton, mit, harvard.

This is what I mean: http://www.tower-research.com/Careers.html look on the right at the list of schools.
 

Yike Lu

Finder of biased coins.
This is what I mean: http://www.tower-research.com/Careers.html look on the right at the list of schools.

Don't read too much into it. I'm from Caltech and I know a fellow alum who works at Tower. If you look at the list of schools on the right, it's all about career fairs i.e. big recruiting events. It's simply not economical for a firm like Tower (vs say a bulge bracket bank) to go all the way to CIT on the west coast (which has all of 200 undergrads per class, a very large percentage of which go to do PhDs) on a recruiting trip.

Of course this explanation wouldn't hold for Yale...
 
Yale has one of the most spectacularly successful endowments...anybody who has any experience there

I think he mean't anybody who has worked for the endowments. Many students in business schools intern or work part-time as analysts for endowments. It is very common at the institutions where the endowment is managed in-house.

Sure - At Pitt I was the "utilities analyst" for the Katz MBA endowment. Apart from some additional bureaucratic experience, I don't see how this alone would make you "one of the best candidates"....
 
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