• C++ Programming for Financial Engineering
    Highly recommended by thousands of MFE students. Covers essential C++ topics with applications to financial engineering. Learn more Join!
    Python for Finance with Intro to Data Science
    Gain practical understanding of Python to read, understand, and write professional Python code for your first day on the job. Learn more Join!
    An Intuition-Based Options Primer for FE
    Ideal for entry level positions interviews and graduate studies, specializing in options trading arbitrage and options valuation models. Learn more Join!

Wristwatch

Both VC and Lange cost serious money. Other good brands are Breguet and F.P. Journe (though I think it's difficult to get hold of the latter). Oh, and I forgot to mention Jaeger Le Coultre (which is what I would like).
The perpetual calendar model from JLC is really pretty in black, though of course it's very expensive.

I really can't wrap my head around their sizes. Perhaps because I'm an Asian, but I've seen some guys with tiny wrists wearing those gigantic watches... Just why?
 
Interesting thread.
I haven't worn a watch since I got my first phone in the 90s. It's just something I need to tell time for me and I understand some who are into watches like previous posters mention.
And if you are into it, you are likely to buy many of them. I have a friend who orders a watch from Amazon every few weeks. Not expensive ones, just something less than $100 and he got several dozen of them.
I guess it's better to have hobbies than none. Some hobbies are more expensive than others.
 
I wear a Casio G-shock everyday, and I fking love it.
Check out the MrG series, it is mix of luxury and reliability. It feels very like you go and buy a Lexus (instead of Mercedes or Porsche...).
 
Last edited:

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
I wear a Casio G-shock everyday, and I fking love it.
Check out the MrG series, it is mix of luxury and reliability. It feels very like you go and buy a Lexus (instead of Mercedes or Porsche...).
Great; it's like having a Nokia 3310.

at the end of the day, gotta go for Japanese reliability.
 
Last edited:
It's just something I need to tell time for me ...

In that case a quartz watch or even your cell phone will serve you fine. A $10 Casio digital watch will give you more accurate time than a $20,000 Rolex. And indeed that cheap Casio watch is exactly what Bill Gates wears -- he wants merely an accurate timepiece and he has it. But his friend and bridge partner Warren Buffett wears a gold Rolex. To each his own.

People talk of the "Industrial Revolution" but in fact there were four. The first was the technology of time-keeping -- storing energy in a coiled spring and then regulating its release through an escapement to give some semblance of accurate time. That's what all these non-quartz watches do. It's a miracle of precision engineering that they manage to be accurate to within a few seconds a day (of course quartz beats them hands down but's that whole different tech and a whole different story). The development of this technology took place over centuries and quite a few prominent scientists were involved in its development -- Galileo and Huygens among them. Every time we open the case back of an analog watch we see all that thought expressed in material form as well as all the precision work of craftsmen. On the other hand, when we open the case back of a quartz watch, we don't see much of anything, and the little we see is not beautiful.

In terms of accurate time-telling, non-quartz belongs to a bygone era. The "Quartz Crisis" of the 1970s was all about Japanese firms like Seiko and Citizen bludgeoning the Swiss watch industry to its knees. That Swiss industry has never been the same again. Prior to the '70s, Swiss watch firms like Patek used to advertise how accurate their timepieces were. Now they advertise what a status symbol they are. Indeed the whole Swiss industry is selling either status or nostalgia for a beautiful technology and craftsmanship that existed before quartz upended it.

As status symbols go, watches like Patek are close to the ultimate. The Dalai Lama has one. Queen Elizabeth II has one (as well as a Jaeger Le Coultre). A Patek says you've arrived. If a Rolex might be found on someone who flies business class, a Patek might be found on someone with his own jet.
 
Last edited:
I really can't wrap my head around their sizes. Perhaps because I'm an Asian, but I've seen some guys with tiny wrists wearing those gigantic watches... Just why?

They're garish and gaudy to my mind. In your face. Brash and insolent and lacking in dignity. I'm of the school of thought that a gentleman's watch should be discreet and unobtrusive, with an understated style and elegance.
 
In that case a quartz watch or even your cell phone will serve you fine. A $10 Casio digital watch will give you more accurate time than a $20,000 Rolex. And indeed that cheap Casio watch is exactly what Bill Gates wears -- he want merely an accurate timepiece and he has it. But his friend and bridge partner Warren Buffett wears a gold Rolex. To each his own.

People talk of the "Industrial Revolution" but in fact there were four. The first was the technology of time-keeping -- storing energy in a coiled spring and then regulating its release through an escapement to give some semblance of accurate time. That's what all these non-quartz watches do. It's a miracle of precision engineering that they manage to be accurate to within a few seconds a day (of course quartz beats them hands down but's that whole different tech and a whole different story). The development of this technology took place over centuries and quite a few prominent scientists were involved in its development -- Galileo and Huygens among them. Every time we open the case back of an analog watch we see all that thought expressed in material form as well as all the precision work of craftsmen. On the other hand, when we open the case back of a quartz watch, we don't see much of anything, and the little we see is not beautiful.

In terms of accurate time-telling, non-quartz belongs to a bygone era. The "Quartz Crisis" of the 1970s was all about Japanese firms like Seiko and Citizen bludgeoning the Swiss watch industry to its knees. That Swiss industry has never been the same again. Prior to the '70s, Swiss watch firms like Patek used to advertise how accurate their timepieces were. Now they advertise what a status symbol they are. Indeed the whole Swiss industry is selling either status or nostalgia for a beautiful technology and craftsmanship that existed before quartz upended it.

As status symbols go, watches like Patek are close to the ultimate. The Dalai Lama has one. Queen Elizabeth II has one (as well as a Jaeger Le Coultre). A Patek says you've arrived. If a Rolex might be found on someone who flies business class, a Patek might be found on someone with his own jet.
I am just a huge fan of gShock HAHA.

Checkout this one.

MRG-G2000HT​

They kill it.

Put the reliability aside, what set it apart is the amount of design and thoughts behind it are derived from a totally different cultural. Oh, and if you open the case back of it (which is very hard to do compare to other swiss made watch), you will find a super organized world like open the iphone case. BTW, if you open a Grand Seiko watch, even a quartz watch, you can find jewelry in its movement.

Back to my analogy, when you can buy a exotic car like Benze S65 or BMW M7, I prefer the Lexus LS 460. Not because it is merely cheaper than former. I think reliability is one element of beauty. It also is a good looking car though.

It is like someone can use just simple linear model to solve the delta volatility problem efficiently while a group of ML guys are just biting around the bush...
 
Last edited:
Screenshot_20210127-135652_Gallery Go.jpg

This is a jewel
 
Last edited:
Th confidence that a good watch imparts (the watch here is a Rolex Day-Date Yellow Gold):

Mate, no, a watch can't impart you any confidence. Neither the car, or the house.
If he dump a load of cash to motivate his sales person, it would be the same effect.
But nice looking classic watch though.
 
One thing I learned through my life is, once you can easily afford something, you will be much less craving for it.
Except good food, good sex, freedom and be Loved.
 
Top