Looking for derivatives book

bigbadwolf

Well-Known Member
Thank you - very helpful.

Current level: Beginner. I understand the basic concepts of differentiation, the rules of derivatives etc. But no prior knowledge of integral calculus or multivariable calculus.

I take it your advice is still valid for such knowledge level?
Yes. Have more than one book at hand. Apostol's books seem to be still available, albeit published in India (which means low-grade ink and paper). Still, each of the two volumes is under $20. Also get the Schaum Series "Beginning Calculus." You already have Lang. I also like Banner's "The Calculus Lifesaver." For multivariable you will need some additional books (other than Apostol, that is), as well as some background in linear algebra.
 

DoFX

New Member
Yes. Have more than one book at hand. Apostol's books seem to be still available, albeit published in India (which means low-grade ink and paper). Still, each of the two volumes is under $20. Also get the Schaum Series "Beginning Calculus." You already have Lang. I also like Banner's "The Calculus Lifesaver." For multivariable you will need some additional books (other than Apostol, that is), as well as some background in linear algebra.
Greatly appreciated - will look into all your recommendations. Thank you.
 
I second Strang's calculus book. It's easy to read and contains lots of nice problems. More important, you can keep it as a reference when you pass your current level.
 

Quasar Chunawala

Active Member
Don't know your level -- are you approaching calc for the first time or want a quick revision? Lang's book is fine. I also like "Beginning Calculus" published by Schaum's (assuming you're learning it for the first time). Apostol's two volumes on calculus (not his analysis book) are also good. Probably the ideal combination is a book that just covers the ideas, with brief sketches of proofs or plausible arguments and a heavier book that is full of problems. Lang is probably okay for the overview. Apostol for the problems. I also like Strang's treatment of calculus but don't remember if his book has loads of drill-type problems.
On learning the computational tools of calculus, I would also like to suggest books by Mir Publishers, Moscow; many titles are freely available at Mir Books. Calculus by Piskunov is a good first read , Problems in Calculus by I.A. Maron has even more drill type problems.

I am taking a course on analysis this year. I have begun reading Terrence Tao's book on analysis supplemented by Stephen Abbot's Understanding Analysis.
 
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