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New Quantnet members say hi

Manolet's Intro

Hi Everyone!

My name is Manolet Go. I just finished my master's in Financial Markets (concentration on Financial Engineering) at IIT, Chicago. And, I am currently looking for a quant developer position in the job market.

Prior to my master's, I was an IT consultant with some experience in programming in Excel VBA. With my master's degree, I acquired other programming skills such as C++, Matlab, Python, etc and some quant skills. Although I finished a degree that I could describe as not as pure quant as it could be and having no prior experience in the finance field, I am still hoping that I could land an entry level quant job, capitalizing on my IT experience and some quant finance I learned from school.

I was wondering if there is someone out there who has the same profile as mine or someone who sympathizes with me. That we could share some ideas on how to be successful in the job market, especially now that the US economy is slowing down and not many jobs are available as before.
 
hi everybody!
I'm yoyo from Shanghai, China, looking forward to get in the field of the core field of financial market. The intensiveness of FE attracts me a lot, I'm planning to get such a programme in the recent years, based on my economic background and Computer Science education during undergraduate study.:)
 
Hi Guys,

I am a new member at this forum and would like to wish everyone success in whatever their trying to achieve by becoming members of this forum.

I am looking for an opportunity to switch careers from Operations Research/ Optimization to finance. I have a PhD in Operations Research, BS & MS in Applied Mathematics, and BS & MS in Computer science all from top universities. I have been working for the past 4 years in Math programming for a very reputable company and prior to that I was a postdoc.

I have a level of mathematical maturity where I can quickly learn almost any kind of mathematical concepts. However, areas where I am currently focussed in my job are in discrete optimization techniques. I have in depth knowledge in probability theory (not the measure theoretic type) and some areas of stochastic processes such as Markov decision processes, algorithms, optimization (mostly linear but some level of non-linear as well), intermediate level of experience in statistics. I am well versed in C, Matlab, and SAS. I have done some self learning in finance by covering most of John Hull's book on derivatives and some other materials related on finance available online. This is pretty much my academic preparation in a nut shell. As for my age I am in my mid 30's.

I am seriously looking for some career guidance to help me prepare myself for an interesting career transition to finance. My main motivation for this move is because:

1. I am feeling a certain level of stagnation in my current job and
2. My deep interest in the working of the financial markets and my analytic bent of mind has attracted me to consider a quantitative finance position
3. I am sincerely hoping to lead a very interesting professional life in the finance industry


My drawbacks as I perceive it : I don't have experience working in the finance industry or having taken any formal training in financial mathematics. Everything I know in finance comes from self study and some seminars. My exposure to areas like PDE's, stochastic differential equations, stochastic calculus and advanced stochastic processes such as martingales are quite limited. As I mentioned before, I can learn these things on the job if it is required, but I have very limited exposure in these areas.

I would like help by getting to know where I might fir in the finance industry and in what capacity: junior quant or in a more senior capacity? I welcome any advice to help me get a better picture of quant job requirements.

Thanks very much to all of you. God Bless

-Sitar
 
Hi Dude and Dudettes

i am working as software developer in one of the major investment banks. Developing trading system for them. Got mitivated by the traders(Clients), planned to pursue my master financial engineering.
i want to explore the world of finance and strategies in algorithmic trading.
i feel so glad to join this forum.

Tx
Selva
 
hi everybody,

I am a Finance undergrad (Junior) at Rutgers University. I am planning on getting a MFE or a masters in a quantitative field. At the moment I work full time for AIG in New York City as an intern. I am currently learning the basics of C and C++ on my own and with the help of others.

Since I am a finance student I am wondering weather to double major or minor in math or computer science. I don't know exactly which would be more important at the moment. They both have their benefits, but I don't want to be an undergrad for 6 years. I am also thinking of just sticking to my major (finance) and taking many math/statistics courses, along with a few computer science related. If anybody has any advice, please don't be shy. I am a straight shooter so I want people to be honest with me and lay it out. I look forward to speaking with many of you.

Also, I'd like to wish everybody good luck in their careers.


Thanks,
Dorin Pislaru
 
From the sounds of it, it seems all of the quants here learned C++ on their own. Download bloodshed C++ and then go to www.cprogramming.com is what I'm doing, since I'd get destroyed by the C++ course taught in my university (it literally weeds out would-be comp sci majors).

As for a math major, I would advise against it. I know that at Lehigh, if you major in finance, you can take a financial mathematics track, which has you taking basic prob n stat, theory of ODEs, and I believe theory of probability (I had all three--the last one WAS PAINFUL...C+ for first time with proofs), and then there's another track which had you taking a pair of Operations Research courses (and the high level ones) and one was an MFE course (I also took both...the deterministic one was with my optimization professor who is an FE researcher, and the MFE course everyone got like 50% at best...I got a 44 and it was a B =P...it was the most fun I've ever had :D)

I think if you just use your electives to seek out the quantitative courses, you'll be in good shape.

Heck, I know I can get into my school's MFE program--but it'd cost me another year and $50,000 in debt! :cry::cry:
 

doug reich

Some guy
1. If you major in finance, it'll say Finance, not math or CS on your resume. Remember that its purpose is just to get interviews.
2. If you have your foot in the door, the most important thing is ability. Material you actual learn in your courses, regardless of major, is what counts.
3. If you go straight into a degree, I don't think it matters what your major is; admissions committees have the ability to look past the name of the degree earned to see the material actually covered.
4. C has similar syntax with C++, but you should regard it as a historical curiosity.

I won't answer your questions directly, but I think you should evaluate them with (the first three) points I gave in mind.

hi everybody,

I am a Finance undergrad (Junior) at Rutgers University. I am planning on getting a MFE or a masters in a quantitative field. At the moment I work full time for AIG in New York City as an intern. I am currently learning the basics of C and C++ on my own and with the help of others.

Since I am a finance student I am wondering weather to double major or minor in math or computer science. I don't know exactly which would be more important at the moment. They both have their benefits, but I don't want to be an undergrad for 6 years. I am also thinking of just sticking to my major (finance) and taking many math/statistics courses, along with a few computer science related. If anybody has any advice, please don't be shy. I am a straight shooter so I want people to be honest with me and lay it out. I look forward to speaking with many of you.

Also, I'd like to wish everybody good luck in their careers.


Thanks,
Dorin Pislaru
 
Following Andy's suggestion I'm here to say hi to everyone in the group. My background is in CS -- CS Ph.D. and CS faculty (since 2002). I have strong quantative skills and programming (C++, Java). I'm now learning quant-related financial knowledge, e.g. by reading the Hull book. From reading the posts here it seems that I'm older than most of you who are at the door of the quant position. Does anyone think I'm already too old for this career change?
 
HELLO
I just joint this form and it look interesting. I am an applied math student graduating this summer. I am taking a class "analysis of Finanacial Data". It is a challenging class.
I hope I find some help and advise from you guys...
 
New member say hello to all of you!

Hello, everybody here! This is Angela.

Thank you for being offered such an opportunity to learn from you. :D

I am very interested in financial engineering, and I have learned more information about quant since going through this website which I am always looking for, even got the very different and wonderful experience of quant here. I am eager to become a quant someday.

Whenever somebody mentions Wall Street, every cell in my body will be activated. I do have got the great place following my heart and soul.:smt024

That is my summary of background:
I have got a bachelor degree of mechanical Electronic engineering in China. However I didn’t have a top GPA. I was engaged in a system engineer for the past 6 years.

So I just live in Toronto right now. To be a quant, I would like to go to the University for studying a related program with quant in Canada. I mean that is my second bachelor degree. This probably can be an assets of being a quant. However, I have no idea which program in the university can better match the quant. How about Computer/Math? So, does anybody give me some advice on it? Or do you have some good deals that I can study in financial engineering in New York based on my educational background and experience as soon as possible. I am getting in trouble about it.

Thank you so much for your help.:sos::prayer::wall
 
Why do you want to get a second bachelor degree? Go for Masters program in Financial Engineering or in Applied Math for Finance. There plenty of programs in New York and Toronto as well.
 
Thank you,Maxrum!

I guess good GPA in University is one of the factors that make sure to access to the top university of pursuing financial engineering in the United States. I only worried about my poor GPA.:-ss

Why do you want to get a second bachelor degree? Go for Masters program in Financial Engineering or in Applied Math for Finance. There plenty of programs in New York and Toronto as well.
 

doug reich

Some guy
I guess good GPA in University is one of the factors that make sure to access to the top university of pursuing financial engineering in the United States. I only worried about my poor GPA.:-ss

As others on this forum have pointed out in the past, you should let the admissions committee at your programs of interest decide your candidacy. Don't waste your time speculating about whether or not you'll get in. Instead, fill holes in your resume (through work, classes, or self-study), contact the admissions people to see if they have any suggestions for you, and apply where you would like to go.

Furthermore, having 6 years of work experience makes your undergrad GPA fairly ancient history; they have much more interesting recent information about your ability to go on. It's basically unheard of for a person to get multiple bachelor's -- you should pursue a master's.
 
Hi Sitar

Hi Sitar as I see your educational background.I see you definatively have the aptitude of being a quant that too a highly paid few years into the job.What I can suggest with my limited knowledge is that you should take a 1 year break from your job and pursue a Master in Financial Engineering.Almost all programs would welcome you.I can understand that it means an investment of time and money.But considering your background you can easily get into a top FE or Quant Fin programs.It would fill your necessary gaps in knowledge both in Finance and Stochastics and else.Moreover you can easily be recruited by a top recruiter at the end of the program.In nut shell this program would act as a launching pad into the world of quantitative finance.Everything said above is true only if you are totally sure to be a quant.



Thanks













Hi Guys,

I am a new member at this forum and would like to wish everyone success in whatever their trying to achieve by becoming members of this forum.

I am looking for an opportunity to switch careers from Operations Research/ Optimization to finance. I have a PhD in Operations Research, BS & MS in Applied Mathematics, and BS & MS in Computer science all from top universities. I have been working for the past 4 years in Math programming for a very reputable company and prior to that I was a postdoc.

I have a level of mathematical maturity where I can quickly learn almost any kind of mathematical concepts. However, areas where I am currently focussed in my job are in discrete optimization techniques. I have in depth knowledge in probability theory (not the measure theoretic type) and some areas of stochastic processes such as Markov decision processes, algorithms, optimization (mostly linear but some level of non-linear as well), intermediate level of experience in statistics. I am well versed in C, Matlab, and SAS. I have done some self learning in finance by covering most of John Hull's book on derivatives and some other materials related on finance available online. This is pretty much my academic preparation in a nut shell. As for my age I am in my mid 30's.

I am seriously looking for some career guidance to help me prepare myself for an interesting career transition to finance. My main motivation for this move is because:

1. I am feeling a certain level of stagnation in my current job and
2. My deep interest in the working of the financial markets and my analytic bent of mind has attracted me to consider a quantitative finance position
3. I am sincerely hoping to lead a very interesting professional life in the finance industry


My drawbacks as I perceive it : I don't have experience working in the finance industry or having taken any formal training in financial mathematics. Everything I know in finance comes from self study and some seminars. My exposure to areas like PDE's, stochastic differential equations, stochastic calculus and advanced stochastic processes such as martingales are quite limited. As I mentioned before, I can learn these things on the job if it is required, but I have very limited exposure in these areas.

I would like help by getting to know where I might fir in the finance industry and in what capacity: junior quant or in a more senior capacity? I welcome any advice to help me get a better picture of quant job requirements.

Thanks very much to all of you. God Bless

-Sitar
 
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