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COMPARE Please, need help: NYU MSMF v.s. Columbia MFE v.s. Cornell MFE

I heard that NYU is doing better on placement and Cornell has improved a lot and has the new NY campus. Just got the offer from them. Need advises...
 
hi i had a similar question. i found the post "Columbia MSFEreject, redirected to MSOR" really helpful (a post by catchuec towards the end). you can also see my post "please help: uchicago finmath/ucberkeley mfe/columbia mfe/cornell mfe". i think NYU is highly regarded both at this site and outside.
 
Just remember that the larger the size of the class at your respective school, the larger the number of students against whom you are competing directly for interviews and jobs. If your program has 70 or 120 people, it may be more difficult for you to obtain the attention of prospective employers than if your program has only 30 full-time students.

Look carefully at the recent placement statistics. If you have dozens of jobless classmates, then your anxiety level may become quite high as you approach the end of your program, especially if you have visa issues.

Also, it may be worth determining whether a larger program might have to impose limits on the number of students enrolled in specific courses. If everyone wants to sign up for elective "X" but few people are interested in elective "Y", will the administration allow everyone desiring "X" to register for it? Or, will they find some scheme to push certain students into the less-desired course? If the school advertises the opportunity to take some courses at other departments/schools within the university (for example, at the Business School), are there limitations which would only allow a handful of students into such a course?

These are questions worth asking before you finalize your choice.
 
Just remember that the larger the size of the class at your respective school, the larger the number of students against whom you are competing directly for interviews and jobs. If your program has 70 or 120 people, it may be more difficult for you to obtain the attention of prospective employers than if your program has only 30 full-time students.

Look carefully at the recent placement statistics. If you have dozens of jobless classmates, then your anxiety level may become quite high as you approach the end of your program, especially if you have visa issues.

Also, it may be worth determining whether a larger program might have to impose limits on the number of students enrolled in specific courses. If everyone wants to sign up for elective "X" but few people are interested in elective "Y", will the administration allow everyone desiring "X" to register for it? Or, will they find some scheme to push certain students into the less-desired course? If the school advertises the opportunity to take some courses at other departments/schools within the university (for example, at the Business School), are there limitations which would only allow a handful of students into such a course?

These are questions worth asking before you finalize your choice.


Thanks for the advise!
 
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