• C++ Programming for Financial Engineering
    Highly recommended by thousands of MFE students. Covers essential C++ topics with applications to financial engineering. Learn more Join!
    Python for Finance with Intro to Data Science
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    An Intuition-Based Options Primer for FE
    Ideal for entry level positions interviews and graduate studies, specializing in options trading arbitrage and options valuation models. Learn more Join!

What books are you currently reading?

Do you know these ones?
http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0486400239/ref=sib_dp_pt#reader-link
http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/9738752035/ref=sib_dp_pt#reader-link

I'm planning to read something from this field and a bit confused which to choose? All 3 are good.
I have sort of glimpsed through certain sections of the second book, since it was one of the recommended reading in my Intro to Engineering Probability and Random Processes course. Comparing, it with "Fortune's Formula" by William Poundstone, "Probability Guide to Gambling" is purely mathematical, whereas "Fortunes Formula" is more like an historical account of the gambling industry at beginning of the 19th century and it parallel's the lives of researchers at primer institution such as MIT and Bell Labs. I hope this insight helps.
 
How is the options, futures and other Derivatives book? is it really design for people with limited math background?

You can't say that. I completed both McDonald's Derivatives Markets and Hull's Options, Futures and Other Derivatives but explanations are fairly well in Hull's book while you will see a bit less mathematically overloaded concepts than McDonald's. But the book with it's contents are really good. If you have stronger math background I'd suggest McDonald anyway.
 
I need to add to my list:
Topology 2nd Edition by James Munkers
Finite-Dimensional Vector Spaces by Paul Halmos (a great read)
An Introduction to Mechanics by Daniel Kleppner and Rober Kolenkow
 
I need to add to my list:
Topology 2nd Edition by James Munkers
Finite-Dimensional Vector Spaces by Paul Halmos (a great read)
An Introduction to Mechanics by Daniel Kleppner and Rober Kolenkow

Unless, unbeknownst to me, Kleppner and Kolenkow has been reprinted, it's hard to get hold of a copy. Halmos is dated and Curtis is better.
 
Unless, unbeknownst to me, Kleppner and Kolenkow has been reprinted, it's hard to get hold of a copy. Halmos is dated and Curtis is better.

I prefer Halmos better.
Halmos in Ch1 covers a normal course in Lin Alg minus eigenvalues and transformations. The sections are short and concise and he doesn't waste any time with a chapter on basic Set Theory.
 
Conspiracy of paper, fiction, David Liss. Historical fiction set against the background of South Sea Company vs. Bank of England rivalry in early 18th century

Coffee Trader, fiction, David Liss. Setting: Amsterdam in 16th century, one man's attempt to corner the burgeoning coffee trade. Monopoly, resource allocation and manipulation, psychological manipulation between men of power and ambition, suspense until the very end, it is all there in the plot.

The Disciplined Trader and Trading in the Zone, both by Mark Douglas. Dealing with psychology and emotion of trader. It is a must read for any who wants to become part of that rare breed of 2% traders who make the bulk of the profits. ( this is quite advanced in its dealing of this topic)

One, Two, Three... Infinity, Facts and Speculations of Science, George Gamov. Fun book exploring various science topics. This could be for someone who wants to add this to a library of science brain teasers books.

Autobiography by Benjamin Franklin, the Library of America edition. The American renaissance man.
 
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