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New Quantnet members say hi

It's a newbie...

Hello, out to everyone on here. It's a pleasure to see so many active members constantly posting valuable information and getting to know each other. I'm currently and undergrad at Hunter college and I recently joined the forum upon researching MFE programs in the NY area. I'm not a math wiz or anything of the sort like I see so many ppl around these neighborhoods are. But I love mathematical finance and economics.

Now, I know I'm new here and I don't want to damper or reign upon the light of anyone else. But it seems like ppl are too focused on just the math side of things. Now don't get me wrong, mathematics/statistics is a wonderful tool to use in understanding and modeling concepts. However, where's the other side of things...the human side? Not everything can be quantified through numbers. Sometimes, ppl need to study the bigger picture as well. So this means trying to understand the behaviors of others and also trying to make sure the models are accurate, like in econometrics. This process is by no means an easy task. Which is why I feel that a team is better capable at doing this than any single person.

Also, no doubt I myself would like to enter into an MFE program, preferably, Baruch. But I see so many ppl that know the same stuff, whether it be black-scholes equations, stochastic processes, C++, Matlab, R, VBA, etc...how is any of this suppose to distinguish anyone person from the next? Shouldn't we also focus on developing OTHER skills that can tie all of this together and strengthen our individuality? Something that can set us apart from "the rest"?

I don't know, maybe it's just me being too cynical. Let me know what you think, especially those that have some experience out there because I'm but a novice 25 y/o, part-time nurse, who loves economics and the financial market.
 

alain

Older and Wiser
I don't think you are being cynical but a little bit naive. Quants tend to be mavericks who disdain the soft skills. The human side goes down the toillete because soft souls will get crushed in the market.

Of course people would want to distinguished themselve from the rest of the pack. How do you measure it? Simple, by the size of the wallet. It comes down to that. Market players want to perfect such skills that will make them the most money and you'll try to develop that edge to the maximum.

This is not a team game. It's more of an individual competition (maybe you can think of a team as an individual entity). Teams are good but, at the end, it comes down to how my team can destroy another team and get the most out of it. That's the reality in black and white.
 
Ok

All right, no doubt. I like your answer. And I can't disagree with you. After all, that's what capitalism is all about, right. And when I said "the human side of things". I didn't mean from a sympathetic perspective. I meant that we also have to look at other factors than just what the numbers tell us. Things like international factors, the different decisions that ppl make depending on what market your looking at, etc. So in other words, doing the math isn't the only thing that will help us predict something or understand something. We need to view things as a bigger picture.

But I was just tired of hearing a lot of ppl constantly boasting about the fact that they know black-scholes equation, monte-carlo, computer programming etc, etc. It gets a little boring hearing about how everyone knows the same stuff. This to me won't be getting anyone's "pocket's fatter". Especially when ppl can't differentiate themselves from the competition. If everyone knows how to count 5+5 and nothing different, then how can we claim to have a comparative advantage that can "destroy the competition"?
 
Hello,
I am a professional trader ,trading in Indian Capital Mkt since 2000,done my Graduation with Satistics as major in 1973 & completed MBA in 1978.
Came here to Learn.

Asish
 
Hi Yoshi!

Yoshi, are you trying to emphasize about having an 'edge' in the markets?
and perhaps that the edge does not comes from mathematical/computing skills alone which can be learned from few books ?
 
Hello,
I am a professional trader ,trading in Indian Capital Mkt since 2000,done my Graduation with Satistics as major in 1973 & completed MBA in 1978.
Came here to Learn.

Asish

Welcome, Asish! We look forward to learning from you as well!:D
 
@suman

its not about emphasizing. Its just about putting one's perspective

@Yoshi

Everyone has his/her own traits. I am not sure if I am the correct person to comment on since I would be starting with my FE program this fall. But I feel that such formal things of mathematics and statistics give you a foundation on which you can justify your "human side". what makes one different is the usage of the knowledge that one has. One person may use the knowledge of black-scholes for doing something while the other may keep it in the bag forever.
 
Hello guyz,

I am Mrudula and I have applied for MFE program at Baruch for Fall-08.
As abt my background, I hv completed my MBA in Finance and was working as Relationship Manager at HDFC Bank-India. Prior to that I completed my BE in Information Technology ans was working as a s/w engineer at Patni Computers. Thts abt me. I am glad i got to know abt quantnet. The posts are very informative and ppl here are friendly :)

Ciao
Cheers
Mrudula
 
@suman

its not about emphasizing. Its just about putting one's perspective

@Yoshi

Everyone has his/her own traits. I am not sure if I am the correct person to comment on since I would be starting with my FE program this fall. But I feel that such formal things of mathematics and statistics give you a foundation on which you can justify your "human side". what makes one different is the usage of the knowledge that one has. One person may use the knowledge of black-scholes for doing something while the other may keep it in the bag forever.

Hey, thanks for that remark. I can see where you're coming from with your explanation. I'm just a type of person that likes to see "fresh" ideas and thinking outside of the box you know. So I was just curious to see if anyone around here is practicing different things. Or using things in their own way. I'm not a financial engineer as of now but I want to learn more about what is actually going on in the field. Because school is one thing but work may be another.

BTW good knowledge with you FE program. So where will you be going to school this fall, if I may ask?
 
Introduction

Hi everyone,

My name is Ibukun Akinbola Akinloye and like to be called Ibukun or better still IBK.

My interests have always being in something that has to do with growth either living or non-living, from farming to learning new ideas and stuffs. When less busy i play more of board games, and am presently learning how to play lawn tennis.

With my little exposure of over 14months now in banking, my interest in Finance is growing everyday.
Well have being looking for a finance course at a masters level that will be able to accomodate my IT background and interest in learning finance before now until i came across this course through UC, Berkeley.

Am applying for the next session starting in march 2009 and before then i wont mind knowing and getting along and learning one or two things from you folks out there.

Waiting for the memory lane to be open, as i believe this is an experience, people and style of learning i will never forget.


Best Regards,

Ibukun Akinloye
 
Hi there!

I am not a quant. No PHD no Masters. No intention to get any. I am just a BSc in CS. But I am an algo developer in a sell side firm. Am I welcomed to join?
 
Hi everybody! I will be applying to MFE programs for 2009. I hold an integrated MSc in mathematics and computing from IIT, India and currently working for a US investment bank in the IT division. After reading a few chapters of J.C Hull and a few chapters from a book on technical analysis i became interested in furthering my career in quantitative finance... but my GRE score is very less 1310 (quant:800 verbal:510) and i don't have any financial certifications... could someone tell me what certifications might help me in both admission as well as it would make sense in the long run...
 

DominiConnor

Quant Headhunter
Andy has a point about the reading list.
One thing I've been trying to research is the drop out rate at different programs.

I have absolutely no hard numbers, but people tell me of 25-35%, which is an expensive thing to go wrong. Since I don't know Kunal, I hope he won't be offended if I assume he is average, and thus ought to be as ready as possible.
 
Hello~ everyone

I'm a new comer to this field~ and I'm planning to start my career as a quant~
Glad to be your friend and learn more from this site.
Thank you~
 
Hello

I am really exciting to join Quantnet and hope to make great use of this community for my career
as well as provide useful information for those who want to work in finace field.
:)
 
Hi everyone,
I consider myself lucky to have found such an active forum for aspiring quants. I have found a wealth of insightful posts & references while browsing the forums the past few days, thanks to all!

I currently work in quantitative modeling on the proprietary trading desk for an IB, but am starting the full time MSCF program at CMU NY this Fall. I hope to develop my maths to a deeper level and continue doing some challenging work in the years ahead.

Glad to meet everyone here.
 
Quirkfee,
You must have found us via GD, right.
What the reason to study FT and not work and study PT? Is your current work something you see yourself doing in the future or you want some different direction? (By the way, what product is you currently on?)
If you prefer, send me a PM. I'm in a similar role as yours but about to graduate from the Baruch MFE program.

In any case, welcome to Quantnet. I notice that we have many recent graduates from the local MFE programs now posting Quantnet which is a great thing to see. Hope to see more discussion and info passing around here.
 
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